Brussels (Bruxelles) – the capital of Belgium, according to the Internet, is not such a big city – less than 150 thousand inhabitants. But it seemed to me a real metropolis. Either territorial extension (I lived on the outskirts and traveled by bus to the center for about forty minutes), or a huge number of tourists, give the feeling of a truly metropolitan city. And yes, traffic is impressive.
The fact is that formally the city is one of the municipalities (including 18 more) of the so-called Brussels-Capital Region with a population of more than 1 million people. Municipalities have their own borders and governments, but this is not noticeable to the tourist and, of course, all these 19 municipalities are considered Brussels.

 

How to get to Brussels

Quite a lot of flights are made to Brussels from Moscow.
Brussels Airport struck with an unprecedented speed of service – in 20 minutes. after disembarking from the plane, I was already on the train.
Brussels Airport
 can be reached by train or bus. The railway station is located under the arrivals and departures hall, on the minus one level. It is very convenient that you can go directly from the airport not only to Brussels, but to almost any city in Belgium.
The bus station is on the same level as the arrivals hall, you just need to go outside. Buses also connect the airport not only with Brussels, but also with other cities.
Detailed information on timetables and routes is on the Brussels Airport website .
major railway junction. You can come from almost any European city. From Cologne to go about 2.5 hours. Just a little longer, despite the much longer distance, from Paris, as Paris and Brussels are connected by the TGV high-speed train line. Naturally, it is easy to get to Belgian cities by train. Direct branches link Brussels with Bruges via Ghent , with Antwerp, Namur and Lille , which, although not Belgian, is just as close.
Timetables and fares can be found on the Belgian Railways website .

 

Sights of Brussels

In Brussels, oddly enough, there are not so many historical sights.
Brussels Cathedral became a cathedral only in 1962. The church into which the relics of St. Guduly, began to build in the XI century. on the site of the church of St. Michael – hence the dedication to two saints. By the way, the relics of St. Gudula (the patroness of Brussels) is no longer in the cathedral – what was left after the looting of the temple by Protestants in the 16th century. kept in Eibingen, Germany.
During restoration work at the end of the 20th century. Romanesque crypt of the 11th century was discovered.

 

Brussels.  Cathedral of St.  Michael and Gudula
Cathedral of St. Michael and Gudula
 Cathedrale Saints-Michel-et-Gudule (XI-XV c.)

Brussels.  Cathedral of St.  Michael and Gudula
Cathedral of St. Michael and Gudula
 Cathedrale Saints-Michel-et-Gudule (XI-XV c.)

Brussels.  Cathedral of St.  Michael and Gudula
Cathedral of St. Michael and Gudula
 Cathedrale Saints-Michel-et-Gudule (XI-XV c.)

Brussels.  Crypt of the Cathedral of St.  Michael and Gudula
Crypt of the Cathedral of St. Michael and Gudula
 Cathedrale Saints-Michel-et-Gudule (XI-XVI c.)

 

The main tourist attraction and the main attraction is the Grand Place. To be honest, there is not so much historicity in it as it seems at first glance. In general, stone buildings, instead of wooden ones, appeared here only in the 17th century, but even then they were repeatedly destroyed and restored.
The exception is the town hall, the main part of which (facing the square) was built from 1402 to 1455.

 

Brussels.  Grand Place
Grand Place

Brussels.  Grand Place
Grand Place

Brussels.  Grand Place
Grand Place

Brussels.  town hall
City Hall
 Hotel de Ville (XV-XVIII c.)

 

In general, in Brussels, as in many cities chosen by tourists, strange as it may seem, things are very bad with the identification of sights. For example, I accidentally met the remains of some city fortifications, which are missing on the tourist map and not marked on the site itself.

 

Brussels.
Remains of fortifications

 

Well, and what about in Brussels without a pissing boy . By the way, I thought it was a modern invention to attract tourists. It turns out not. A fountain with a stone boy existed as early as the 14th century, and in the 16th century. the figure was replaced with the current bronze one.

 

Brussels.  Manneken Pis
Manneken Pis

 

 

Maps of Brussels

Busseles map
Brussels sightseeing tourist map

bruxelles center map
Brussels city center map

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