Bangkok is a very large city (over 5.5 million inhabitants) and, to my surprise, very modern. If you do not take into account the historical center, which will be discussed later, everything is very civilized. Most of all, we are pleased with the well-developed public transport system and the presence of large supermarkets. Well, in general, Bangkok looks very technologically advanced – multi-level transport interchanges, skyscrapers …

 

Bangkok.
Bangkok from the airplane window

Bangkok.

Bangkok.

 

Bangkok.

Bangkok.

Attractions of Bangkok

I don’t know if there are analogues of European tourist centers in Bangkok, which are needed to get a free city map. I haven’t seen those. On the Internet they write that the card can be taken at the exit from the airport, but I forgot about it, so I had to buy it in a supermarket.

I’ll tell you right away about the historical sights. Usually this is the most important part of exploring the city for me, but in Asia it’s impossible to feel the spirit of history, simply because I don’t know this history… No, in preparation for the trip, I read the relevant books (not so many, by the way), in some places even it was interesting. But when you stand in front of a certain temple and read that it was built then, this does not mean anything at all.. Moreover, all these, sometimes very beautiful buildings, are mostly not so old, since the local climate is not contributes to their preservation and they are constantly updated. So when describing the sights of Bangkok, I will not delve into history. I won’t even indicate the period of construction, since this is nothing more than the date of foundation, to today’s buildings, as a rule,

There are several large parks in Bangkok, I visited two ( Lumpini Park and Chaktuchak Park ) . The impressions are pleasant – a lot of various greenery, ponds, very spacious.

 

Bangkok. lumpini park
Lumpini Park

Bangkok. lumpini park
Lumpini Park

Bangkok. Monument to King Rama VI in front of Lumpini Park
King Rama VI Monument in front of Lumpini Park

Bangkok. Chachutac Park
Chatuchak Park

Bangkok. Chachutac Park
Chatuchak Park

Bangkok. Chachutac Park
Chatuchak Park

Near Chachutak Park is a local attraction, the Chachutak Market . What is interesting in this market, I did not understand. The usual huge flea market. Narrow aisles, crowds of people. It would be nice if they sold something unusual or interesting there, like flea markets in Europe, but no – for the most part, Chinese junk.

 Bangkok. Chachutak Market
Chatuchak Market

Bangkok is quite clearly divided into modern areas with skyscrapers and the old center. In the latter, there are both just old houses and a slum-like building (mainly near the Chao Phraya River)

Bangkok.
Old quarters of Bangkok

Bangkok.
Old quarters of Bangkok

Bangkok.
Old quarters of Bangkok

And there is also a very special part of the city – Bangkok’s Chinatown . I have not been to China yet, but now I can imagine what a typical Chinese city looks like. 🙂 Nothing reminds me of Thailand at all. If the temples, in principle, do not differ in anything special, just the inscriptions are Chinese, then the street life is simply stunning. And most importantly, the transition is very abrupt – here it is Thailand, and now China.

 

Bangkok. Gateway to Chinatown
Gateway to Chinatown

The main historical attraction of Chinatown is the Temple of the Golden Buddha . The Buddha himself, 3 meters tall, was cast in the 13th century. out of 5.5 tons of gold (!) sits on the fourth floor. The lower floors are occupied by a museum, the exposition of which is dedicated to the history of the Chinese community in Bangkok.

 

Bangkok. Wat Traimit - Temple of the Golden Buddha
Wat Traimit – Temple of the Golden Buddha

 

Bangkok. Chinatown
Chinatown Bangkok

Bangkok. Chinatown
Chinatown Bangkok

Bangkok. Chinatown
Chinatown Bangkok

Bangkok. Chinatown
Chinatown Bangkok

Bangkok. Chinatown
Chinatown Bangkok

Bangkok. Chinatown
Chinatown Bangkok

Bangkok. Chinatown
Chinatown Bangkok

In addition to the above, non-religious sights in Bangkok are represented by various kinds of monuments, royal residences and the remains of defensive structures.
As for the monuments, I don’t understand what is interesting about them at all. As a rule, they do not represent any artistic value, of course, there is a semantic load, but what is attractive in this? Well, since these are considered landmarks, here are a couple of monuments – Victory (in the Thai-French war of 1940-1941) and Democracy (the Revolution of 1932, which established a constitutional monarchy, instead of an absolute one).

 

Bangkok. Victory Monument
Victory Monument

Bangkok. Democracy Monument
Democracy Monument

Ananda Samakhom is one of the buildings where events were held in the presence of the king (throne room). The palace is of a completely European look, which is not surprising, since it was built by Italian architects (at the beginning of the 20th century). Now here is a museum. There is another royal palace in Bangkok , which, in fact, is not a palace, but a huge complex of various buildings. This time I did not get there, there was no time to stand in a huge queue. I didn’t manage to take a picture either – it’s all surrounded by a blank fence. By the way, visiting this palace is not cheap.

 

Bangkok. Ananda Samakhom
Royal Palace Ananda Samakhom Throne Hall

Bangkok. Ananda Samakhom
Royal Palace Ananda Samakhom Throne Hall

Bangkok. Ananda Samakhom
Royal Palace Ananta Samakhom Throne Hall

The drum tower served to warn the townspeople (in case of fire, etc.). On each floor there were drums of different sizes and they gave a signal in different situations. Thus, by the sound it was possible to determine what exactly happened. This tower is a frank remake. The original building was demolished when a nearby park was laid out. Exactly according to the proverb “What we have we do not store, having lost weeping.”

 

Bangkok. drum tower
Drum Tower

The defensive structures of Bangkok are represented by the remains of a wall with two forts and a fortress (I did not get to it). All this is not so old (late 18th century)

 

Bangkok. Fort Mahakan
Mahakan Fort

The flower market is another unusual attraction in Bangkok. Its purpose, of course, is purely utilitarian – the market, it is the market. Flowers are widely used in various ceremonies, since there are no problems with their cultivation in Thailand. The market is large, there are many different flowers and products made from them – garlands, wreaths, etc.

 

Bangkok. flower market
Flower’s Market

And now all the same about the temples, called in Thailand “wat”. You can enter the temple grounds only with covered knees and shoulders. This does not apply to vats that have been turned into museums, but in principle, shorts are allowed into ordinary temples. I respect the feelings of believers, but walking in the heat in long pants … So I violated, yes, I hope I didn’t offend anyone.
There are many temples in Bangkong, but despite all this diversity, they seemed somehow monotonous to me. 🙂 There are, of course, exceptions, but most of them look about the same – roofs on top of each other, gold trim, gilded statues … That’s about the same as Wat Sitaram.

 

Bangkok. Wat Sitaram
Wat Sitaram

Probably, this is still due to the difference in cultural perception, so cotton wool, of course, is different. The eyes, perhaps, refuse to perceive details because of the abundance of decorations …
In general, okay, here is a temple that you definitely can’t confuse with anything, thanks to the emerald tower (prang) – Wat Ratchaburana .

 

Bangkok. Wat Ratchaburana
Wat Ratchaburana

Bangkok. Wat Ratchaburana
Wat Ratchaburana

Although, prang prang, the temple itself is quite standard. 🙂

Another interesting temple, or rather, the temple complex – Wat Pho . Unlike the previous one, they take money for entry, and not even so little. But it’s worth a visit – a large area, everything is very beautiful. In the middle there is an exhibition of old photographs (well, copies, I guess). It was interesting to see what Thailand (more precisely, then Siam) looked like 100-150 years ago.

 

Bangkok. Wat Pho
Wat Pho

Bangkok. Wat Pho
Wat Pho

Bangkok. Wat Pho
Wat Pho

Bangkok. Wat Pho
Wat Pho

Bangkok. Wat Pho
Wat Pho

Bangkok. Wat Pho
Wat Pho

Bangkok. King Mongkut (Rama IV) and 11 of his children
King Mongkut (Rama IV) and 11 of his children (18 in total 🙂 (1862)

 

Bangkok. Wat Pho
Wat Pho

Bangkok. Wat Pho
Wat Pho

Unusual, if not in appearance, then in location, the temple of Wat Saket (aka Golden Mountain ). The main building is located on a high hill, where a rather steep staircase leads. Along the way, various sculptural and fountain compositions are arranged, and from the top you can admire the surroundings.

 

Bangkok. Wat Saket
Wat Saket (Golden Mount)

Bangkok. Wat Saket
Wat Saket (Golden Mount)

Bangkok. Wat Saket
Wat Saket (Golden Mount)

Even before one unusual temple – Loha Prasat , also called a metal castle, I did not get. Here he is from afar.

 

Bangkok. Wat Loha Prasat
Wat Loha Prasat (Metal Castle)

 

Actually, this is all that I managed to see in two days in Bangkok. Of course, this is not all that would be interesting to see. A full inspection takes much more time, because, in principle, the city is very large and the distances between sights are rather big, but with public transport in the center of the problem.

See also – how to get around Bangkok

bangkok center map
Bangkok city center map

bangkok china town map
Bangkok chinatown map

bangkok khaosan map
Map of Khaosan District

 

bangkok silom map
Map of Silom District

 

bangkok sukhumvit map
Sukumvit area map

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